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      /  EXPLORING EARLY ’90S VIDEO GAME ARCHITECTURE WITH ANOTHER WORLD
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DiscreetFX 
EXPLORING EARLY ’90S VIDEO GAME ARCHITECTURE WITH ANOTHER WORLD
Posted on 19-Jan-2020 23:32:29
#1 ]
Super Member
Joined: 12-Feb-2003
Posts: 1766
From: Chicago, IL

Curious about past computer architectures? Software engineer [Fabien Sanglard] has been experimenting with porting Another World, an action-adventure platformer, to different machines and comparing the results in his “Polygons of Another World” project.

The results are pretty interesting. Due to the game’s polygon-based graphics, optimizations vary widely across different architectures, with tricks allowing the software to run on hardware released five years before the game’s publication. The consoles explored are primarily from the early ’90s, ranging from the Amiga 500, Atari ST, IBM PC, and Super Nintendo to the Sega Genesis.

The actual game contains very little code, with the original version at 6000 lines of assembly. The executable simply exists as a virtual machine host that reads and executes uint8_t opcodes, with most of the business logic implemented with bytecode. The graphics use 16 palette-based colors, despite the Amiga 500 supporting up to 32 colors. However, the aesthetics still fit the game nicely, with some very pleasant

Read complete article linked below.

https://hackaday.com/2020/01/17/exploring-early-90s-video-game-architecture-with-another-world/

Last edited by DiscreetFX on 19-Jan-2020 at 11:38 PM.

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MEGA_RJ_MICAL 
Re: EXPLORING EARLY ’90S VIDEO GAME ARCHITECTURE WITH ANOTHER WORLD
Posted on 20-Jan-2020 0:29:57
#2 ]
Regular Member
Joined: 13-Dec-2019
Posts: 132
From: AMIGAWORLD.NET WAS ORIGINALLY FOUNDED BY DAVID DOYLE

@DiscreetFX

Friend DiscreetFX,

you changed your signature! I am glad I successfully carried you to take a peek into the contradictory nature of your previous one.

With that behind us, let's bask in the ingeniousness of Another World.
From the VM-based design to the scalable graphics, an example in futureproof architecture that should have taught a lesson to OS designers, too.









































































































































































































































































































































































first edited by MEGA_RJ_MICAL

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