Click Here
home features news forums classifieds faqs links search
5630 members 
Amiga Q&A /  Free for All /  Emulation /  Gaming / (Latest Posts)
Login

Nickname

Password

Lost Password?

Don't have an account yet?
Register now!

Support Amigaworld.net
Your support is needed and is appreciated as Amigaworld.net is primarily dependent upon the support of its users.
Donate

Menu
Main sections
» Home
» Features
» News
» Forums
» Classifieds
» Links
» Downloads
Extras
» OS4 Zone
» IRC Network
» AmigaWorld Radio
» Newsfeed
» Top Members
» Amiga Dealers
Information
» About Us
» FAQs
» Advertise
» Polls
» Terms of Service
» Search

IRC Channel

Who's Online
60 crawler(s) on-line.
 13 guest(s) on-line.
 0 member(s) on-line.



You are an anonymous user.
Register Now!
 Kraftwerk2:  12 mins ago
 eliyahu:  19 mins ago
 rbelk:  25 mins ago
 hth313:  36 mins ago
 Jasper:  38 mins ago
 Fl@sh:  1 hr 9 mins ago
 freak:  1 hr 28 mins ago
 ggw:  1 hr 36 mins ago
 TiredofLife:  1 hr 36 mins ago
 Trekiej:  1 hr 43 mins ago

AmigaWorld - Amiga Community Portal


Floppy autoloader takes the pain out of archiving 5000 Amiga disks

Date 3-Apr-2012 15:56:16
Topic: hardware Classic


From Hack a Day

[c&p]Archiving data from old floppy disks can be a tedious process at best. Poorly labeled disks combined with slow transfer speeds put it high on the list of things we would rather not do, and it turns out that [Dweller] was of the same opinion. With an estimated 5,000 floppies in his collection, he finally decided it was time to clean house.

With no idea of what was stored where, he decided the best way to go about the process was to read all of the disks, archiving everything, saving the sorting process for later. He originally started by building a floppy autoloader out of Lego Mindstorm parts, which looked good on paper, but performed pretty poorly.

He came across an old floppy duplicator on eBay and figured that since the machine was built for handling gobs of disks, that it was the perfect base for his autoloader. He pulled the mechanical bits from the machine, incorporating them into the rig you see above. He swapped out the duplicator’s brains for an Arduino, which allows him to batch copy his disks and save a picture of each label with little effort.

He says that the system works great, making his life a lot easier


Includes video of the machine working.



This article comes from AmigaWorld - Amiga Community Portal
https://amigaworld.net

The URL for this story is:
https://amigaworld.net/article.php?storyid=6318